Brooklyn College Writing Across the Curriculum


Using Online Writing Tools in Your Course

Websites for Blogging

WordPress

Blogger

LiveJournal

Tumblr

Websites for Wikis

Wikispaces

Wikia

Google Sites

PBWorks

Other tools and ideas

YouTube

Flickr

Dipity

Twitter

Goodreads

Surveymonkey

Google (Maps, Docs, Groups)

Wikipedia

Podbean

Resources and Examples

CUNY Academic Commons

Academic Commons Wiki

Looking for Whitman

TeachWeb2

Commoncraft

Digital Writing Wiki

E-Portfolios

General Suggestions

• Require that students use one email address and one username (preferably with their name in it) so they can be identified on the web.

• Make sure you get their address right away, and not just on paper, which often goes awry; ask them to email you.

• Explaining online tasks is easier when the students can look at the screen, so either get a smart classroom or bring a TV or projector to class at least once or twice.

• It’s better to require that students post regularly rather than that they post a certain number of times by the end of the semester—because they may only post at the end.

• Perhaps suggest to students that they write their posts in a word processor and then copy them to the blog, which may save some grief.

• Students should be encouraged to edit their work online just as much as they do offline. However, in order to foster dialogue, try to engage with student posts on the level of content rather than mechanics.

• Student wikis are more likely to be successful if it is a topic the students feel they are experts on—if it is a matter of simple observation or interpretation, for example.

• The Google habit is sometimes deleterious to student research skills, but you can combat this by using Google in class—demonstrate to students how they need to be discriminating about sources and info that they find online.








%d bloggers like this: